HERspectives: Eugenie Anderson

Helen Eugenie Moore Anderson, called Eugenie, was born in 1909 in Adair, Iowa. She studied at Stephens College in Columbia Missouri, and then at Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa. In 1929 she transferred to Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, where she met and married John Pierce Anderson. In 1930, they moved to New York City where Eugenie enrolled at the Institute of Musical Art.  In 1937 Anderson traveled to Europe, where she witnessed “a group of uniformed five-year-old boys stepping in lock step.” She was so moved by the rise of fascism in Germany that she returned to the United States determined to advocate for diplomacy and democracy....

Continue  

From Warsaw to Detroit, forging ties through Journalism and Culture

The following post was submitted by Jakub Mejer from Poland. He is an incoming fellow of the Central and Eastern European Journalism Program (CEEJ), which was postponed due to COVID-19. Until the fellows can resume in-person programming, they are participating in a webinar series and contributing to a Q&A blog series. This post is Part 10 in the blog series. What brought you to the area of journalism? What made you want to become a journalist? Is there someone that inspired you? Some time ago my friend from primary school told me, “You’ve always wanted to be a journalist.”...

Continue  

HERspectives: Edda Collins Coleman

Edda Collins Coleman is a Managing Director at Cogent Strategies, a certified woman-owned small business specializing in government relations, communications and digital analytics. This interview was conducted by Sheerica Ware Wilkins, a Corporate Research Fellow at Meridian. It is part of a series highlighting and celebrating women leaders during Women’s History Month. You co-founded a non-profit called the All in Together Campaign (AIT) that is geared towards activating the civic power of women in private senior leadership, and have had great success in convening thousands of women in technology and other sectors. What’s the advantage of businesswomen leading in...

Continue  

Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield

This post was written by Katie Conti, Program Coordinator in the Meridian Center for Global Leadership. It is a part of a blog series highlighting and acknowledging the work and contributions of Black diplomats during Black History Month. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield is a distinguished career diplomat and trailblazer for women and people of color in the field of foreign affairs. From “gumbo diplomacy,” her Cajun spin on building cultural connections, to the strength drawn from lessons of kindness and compassion instilled by her mother at a young age, she brings a unique frame of reference to her newly sworn-in...

Continue  

Former United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice

This post was written by Katie Hudak Senior Program Associate / Social Media Facilitator at Meridian. It is a part of a blog series highlighting and acknowledging the work and contributions of Black diplomats during Black History Month. American political scientist and diplomat Condoleezza Rice broke barriers when she became the first black woman to serve as the United State’s national security adviser, as well as the second woman and first black woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State (2005-2009).  Born in 1954 in Alabama to Angelena Ray Rice, a high school science, music and oratory teacher, and John Wesley Rice, Jr., a high school guidance...

Continue